Why Anxiety in Hyperthyroidism? Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

Why Anxiety in Hyperthyroidism? Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

Why anxiety in hyperthyroidism? Hyperthyroidism is a very common cause of anxiety. Anxiety can be a mild, fleeting feeling of unease, or it can be a more intense feeling that can make you feel tense, uncomfortable, or stressed.

Anxiety can make you feel on edge and can make it difficult to concentrate. Many people with hyperthyroidism also experience other symptoms of hyperthyroidism, such as high temperature, rapid heartbeat, and fatigue. These symptoms may make you feel more anxious.

Many people with hyperthyroidism also have underlying social anxiety. Anxiety may make you feel more tense, less able to relax, and less able to cope with unpleasantness.

Hyperthyroidism and anxiety are separate conditions, but people with both of these symptoms might feel more anxious. To learn more about anxiety and hyperthyroidism, read on.

What is Hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is a disease in which the thyroid gland produces an excess of thyroid hormones, which results in an overactive thyroid gland. Hyperthyroidism occurs most often in middle-aged women.

It is a more serious problem than hypothyroidism, which is when the thyroid produces too little thyroid hormone. Hyperthyroidism occurs when the thyroid produces too much thyroid hormone, which can lead to heart arrhythmias, a rapid heart rate, and heart palpitations. Hyperthyroidism may occur as a result of an overactive thyroid gland or an overactive Pituitary gland.

Hyperthyroidism occurs most often in middle-aged women. It is a more serious problem than hypothyroidism, which is when the thyroid produces too little thyroid hormone.

Hyperthyroidism occurs when the thyroid produces too much thyroid hormone, which can lead to heart arrhythmias, a rapid heart rate, and heart palpitations. Hyperthyroidism may occur as a result of an overactive thyroid gland or an overactive Pituitary gland.

How hyperthyroidism affects your systems

Hyperthyroidism is a condition that causes your body to produce more hormones than it usually does. This is because the thyroid gland is responsible for producing hormones like thyroxine and triiodothyronine.

In addition, other organs in the body can be affected as a result of hyperthyroidism. These organs include the heart, lungs, liver, skeletal muscles, and digestive system. The symptoms of hyperthyroidism vary from person to person and depend on the organs affected by it.

Anxiety is one of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism. It affects the brain, which is the center of all our thoughts and emotions. Anxiety is a normal response to changes in our lives. When you are anxious, it goes beyond normal uneasiness.

It’s a feeling of being on edge, with a constant feeling of worry. Hyperthyroidism can cause anxiety because of the stress it causes on the body and mind. The symptoms of anxiety in hyperthyroidism are similar to those of anxiety in healthy people. If you experience any of these symptoms, you may be anxious because of hyperthyroidism.

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is a feeling of uneasiness that doesn’t go away even when you’re doing something to take your mind off of it. It’s the feeling of being on edge, with a constant feeling of worry.

Everyone feels anxious from time to time and it can be caused by many different factors. One of the causes of anxiety is hyperthyroidism, which can cause anxiety because of the stress it causes on the body and mind.

There are many causes of anxiety, and hyperthyroidism is one of them. If you’re experiencing these symptoms even when you’re not experiencing any other symptoms of hyperthyroidism, it may be time for you to see a doctor. Your doctor will make a diagnosis based on your symptoms and can prescribe treatment options for you.

Anxiety is also a symptom of some other conditions, such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). If you experience any of these symptoms you may be suffering from anxiety because of hyperthyroidism.

Why anxiety in hyperthyroidism?

Anxiety is a common condition that affects many people. It is an emotional experience of unease and worry that often occurs without any specific cause for concern. While anxiety can happen to anyone at any time, it may be more likely to occur in specific situations, such as during an examination or job interview.

Hyperthyroidism may cause anxiety by making you feel on edge, less able to concentrate, or excited. When you have anxiety, it’s the anticipation of symptoms that cause your nerves to fire, not the actual occurrence of symptoms. As a result, you might feel even more tense than usual. This also may make it harder to relax, which can make you feel less able to cope with unpleasantness.

Hyperthyroidism has also been associated with an increased risk of developing social phobia. In these studies, people with hyperthyroidism are more likely to experience a higher level of anxiety in general, not just social anxiety.

Hyperthyroidism may cause anxiety by making you feel on edge, less able to concentrate, or excited. When you have anxiety, it’s the anticipation of symptoms that cause your nerves to fire, not the actual occurrence of symptoms. As a result, you might feel even more tense than usual. This also may make it harder to relax, which can make you feel less able to cope with unpleasantness.

Hyperthyroidism has also been associated with an increased risk of developing social phobia. In these studies, people with hyperthyroidism are more likely to experience a higher level of anxiety in general, not just social anxiety.

Causes of Anxiety in Hyperthyroidism

The causes of anxiety in hyperthyroidism are different for each person. For some, it may be the stress that hyperthyroidism causes on their body and mind. For others, they may have a genetic predisposition to anxiety.

Some people who have hyperthyroidism may find themselves more emotionally vulnerable than they were before they had it. They may also feel stressed more often and can’t control their feelings as easily as someone who doesn’t have hyperthyroidism.

For those with a genetic predisposition, the increased hormone levels may cause them to have symptoms of anxiety.

Symptoms of Anxiety in Hyperthyroidism

The symptoms of anxiety in hyperthyroidism are similar to those of anxiety in healthy people. If you experience any of these symptoms, you may be anxious because of hyperthyroidism:

  • Nervousness
  • Restlessness
  • Blushing
  • Pacing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle aches
  • Sweating
  • Dry throat
  • Unexplained weight loss or weight gain
  • Chest pain
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing

What does hyperthyroidism anxiety feel like?

What does hyperthyroidism anxiety feel like?

You feel the emotional Extremes. This means anxiety, irritability, mood swings, and nervousness are just some of the emotional changes that people with hyperthyroidism can experience.

People with hyperthyroidism might feel anxious about their symptoms, the future, or their diagnosis. But anxiety about your diagnosis is common, particularly if you think it’s related to your hyperthyroidism. Many people with hyperthyroidism also worry about their treatment and the side effects of medication.

People with hyperthyroidism also may spend a lot of time thinking about what they have done that could have caused the condition. This might lead to guilt and self-blame. Usually, hyperthyroidism anxiety will begin to improve once your diagnosis is confirmed.

Can hyperthyroidism cause extreme anxiety?

Yes, thyroid disease can affect your mood — primarily causing either anxiety or depression. Hyperthyroidism may cause anxiety by making you feel on edge, less able to concentrate, or excited. When you have anxiety, it’s the anticipation of symptoms that cause your nerves to fire, not the actual occurrence of symptoms.

As a result, you might feel even more tense than usual. This also may make it harder to relax, which can make you feel less able to cope with unpleasantness. Hyperthyroidism has also been associated with an increased risk of developing social phobia.

In these studies, people with hyperthyroidism are more likely to experience a higher level of anxiety in general, not just social anxiety. Hyperthyroidism may cause anxiety by making you feel on edge, less able to concentrate, or excited.

When you have anxiety, it’s the anticipation of symptoms that cause your nerves to fire, not the actual occurrence of symptoms. As a result, you might feel even more tense than usual. This also may make it harder to relax, which can make you feel less able to cope with unpleasantness.

Hyperthyroidism has also been associated with an increased risk of developing social phobia. In these studies, people with hyperthyroidism are more likely to experience a higher level of anxiety in general, not just social anxiety.

Can hyperthyroidism be mistaken for anxiety?

Hyperthyroid can present with the same symptoms of a panic attack such as shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, and abdominal distress. However, hyperthyroidism is caused by an overactive thyroid gland, while panic attacks are caused by an overactive brain (called the autonomic nervous system) that is usually under control.

People with hyperthyroidism may also experience mood changes, such as irritability, which can make it difficult to differentiate between the two conditions.

However, hyperthyroidism can be treated and managed, which can help you feel better, return to work, and live a normal life again. You can find more information about treatment and management of hyperthyroidism on the National Goitrous Association website.

Treatment for Anxiety in People with Hyperthyroidism

Treatment for Anxiety in People with Hyperthyroidism

Although there is currently no cure for hyperthyroidism, it can be managed with treatment.

Thyroid supplements, beta-blockers, self-care, and support from your doctor or therapist can help reduce anxiety in people with hyperthyroidism. Sometimes a mental health professional can help you learn self-care skills that can improve your quality of life.

Some people with hyperthyroidism might benefit from seeing a mental health professional. A psychotherapist or psychiatrist can provide you with strategies to cope with your symptoms and promote your emotional well-being. Some people with both anxiety and hyperthyroidism might benefit from seeing a dual specialty physician, such as a psychiatrist or psychologist who specializes in thyroid disorders.

Thyroid hormones affect many parts of the body and may have unwanted effects when the thyroid gland overproduces or underproduces them. Beta blockers aim to reduce the sympathetic nervous system activity, which is responsible for both the hyperactivity and anxiety symptoms of hyperthyroidism.

Treatment usually involves the use of anti-anxiety medications like Xanax or Valium. These medications help to alleviate symptoms and reduce anxiety. There are also lifestyle changes that can be made to reduce stress levels, including getting enough sleep and exercising regularly.

If your anxiety is severe, you may want to consider taking antidepressants as well. They do not work for everyone, but they have been found to be effective in some cases. A doctor will determine which medication is best for you based on your individual needs and symptoms.

Do antidepressants help hyperthyroidism?

Currently, treatment options for people with hyperthyroidism and anxiety or depressive symptoms include medications such as beta-blockers for anxiety and l-thyroxine. Some studies have found that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as sertraline, paroxetine, citalopram, and fluoxetine, can reduce T4 hormone levels by 11.2%.

However, one small study found no change in anxiety symptoms in people with hypo- or hyperthyroidism taking SSRIs. There is also some evidence that talking therapies (such as cognitive behavioral therapy) can be helpful for people with both anxiety and hyperthyroidism.

Thyroid specialists will discuss treatment options and risks and benefits associated with medications with people with hyperthyroidism.

Why are beta-blockers used in hyperthyroidism?

Beta-blockers lessen the signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism whose genesis is increased beta-adrenergic tone. They decrease the heart rate and lower blood pressure. When your stress response is too much, beta-blockers can help to calm you down by lowering your heart rate and blood pressure.

Risk Factors of Anxiety in People with Hyperthyroidism

Psychosocial factors including stress have been associated with mental symptoms, other mental disorders. Physical symptoms of hyperthyroidism, such as heart palpitations, high blood pressure, and fatigue, may also cause anxiety in some people.

Hyperthyroidism may be associated with other mental disorders, such as major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorder.

Thyroid disease may also be associated with mood or anxiety disorders because of the co-morbidity between thyroid diseases and these disorders, the high prevalence of thyroid diseases, and the potential heterogeneity of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

What causes nervousness hyperthyroidism?

When your thyroid gland is overactive, it causes your body to speed up some processes causing thyroid signs and symptoms. One of these symptoms is increased nervousness, also known as anxiety. This overactivity can be caused by a number of things including:

  • An overactive pituitary gland
  • A tumor on the thyroid gland
  • Exposure to radiation or toxic substances
  • Certain medications
  • Pregnancy

What other thyroid problems cause anxiety?

Hypothyroidism is a condition where you produce less thyroid hormones causing sluggishness and also contributing to weight gain and mood changes. These are all symptoms that can lead to anxiety.

Hypothyroidism is a condition caused by the thyroid gland not producing enough hormones. It’s a common problem and is most often diagnosed in women. When your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones, it can interfere with the way your body normally operates. In some cases, this can cause anxiety because of the stress it would put on your body and mind.

Hypothyroidism affects more women than men, though men can also be affected. There are different types of hypothyroidism and they are treated differently. If you have hypothyroidism and experience anxiety, you may benefit from treatment or medication as well as lifestyle changes that help reduce stress levels.

Conclusion

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid produces too much thyroid hormone. It can be caused by an overactive thyroid gland or by an overactive pituitary gland. It can also occur in people who have a genetic mutation.

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone. The thyroid hormones are essential to many body functions, including regulating heart rate, body temperature, and metabolism.

Long periods of hyperthyroidism can affect how a person feels and acts. If left untreated, hyperthyroidism can lead to heart problems, a fast heartbeat, and other health problems.

Anxiety is a common condition that can occur along with hyperthyroidism. Anxiety can make you feel on edge and unable to concentrate. It can make you feel tense, uncomfortable, and stressed. Anxiety often involves worrying about things, such as your health or your performance at work

Symptoms of hyperthyroidism include:

  • Feeling more awake than usual
  • Feeling more active than usual
  • Having a faster than usual heartbeat
  • Feeling warm

Hyperthyroidism can occur in people of any age, but most commonly occurs in middle-aged women. It is a more serious problem than hypothyroidism, which is when the thyroid produces too little thyroid hormone. Hyperthyroidism occurs when the thyroid produces too much thyroid hormone, which can lead to heart arrhythmias, a rapid heart rate, and heart palpitations. Hyperthyroidism may occur as a result of an overactive thyroid gland or an overactive Pituitary gland.

FAQs

Why are beta-blockers used in hyperthyroidism?

Thyroid hormones affect many parts of the body and may have unwanted effects when the thyroid gland overproduces or underproduces them. Beta-blockers aim to reduce the sympathetic nervous system activity, which is responsible for both the hyperactivity and anxiety symptoms of hyperthyroidism.

What is hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone. The thyroid hormones are essential to many body functions, including regulating heart rate, body temperature, and metabolism. Long periods of hyperthyroidism can affect how a person feels and acts.
If left untreated, hyperthyroidism can lead to heart problems, a fast heartbeat, and other health problems. Anxiety is a common condition that can occur along with hyperthyroidism. Anxiety can make you feel on edge and unable to concentrate. It can make you feel tense, uncomfortable, and stressed. Anxiety often involves worrying about things, such as your health or your performance at work.

Can low TSH levels cause anxiety?

The Thyroid/Energy Link is a major factor in anxiety and depression. Low TSH levels can be a contributing cause of anxiety in a similar way that it causes depression. If you have an underactive thyroid, your body may not be able to produce enough of the T4 hormone. This can lead to a diminished level of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. These two hormones help regulate moods and emotions. So, if your thyroid is low, it could be causing anxiety.

How can you treat anxiety in hyperthyroidism?

Anxiety can be present all day, or it can come and go. The symptoms of anxiety vary from person to person and depend on the organs affected by it. It’s important to note that these symptoms are not only present in hyperthyroidism but also in healthy people.
Anxiety is treated with counseling, therapy, and medications. These treatments work best in combination with each other. Counseling is typically the first step because it teaches you how to identify your emotions and manage them accordingly.
Therapy shows you how to cope with stress and find ways to relax when anxiety starts to escalate. Medications help balance out your hormones so that they stay at an optimal level.